Reviewed by:
Rating:
5
On 15.09.2020
Last modified:15.09.2020

Summary:

Du ehrlich und transparent belohnt wirst.

Jekyll And Hyde Online

Robert Louis Stevenson: The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde | Ein angesehener Wissenschaftler, ein mysteriöses Online-Material/Downloads. Robert Louis Stevenson: Der seltsame Fall des Dr. Jekyll und Mr. Hyde Mit voll verlinktem, detailliertem Inhaltsverzeichnis Neu editiert, mit moderat aktualisierter​. Jekyll & Hyde. Musical in zwei Akten Buch und Liedtexte von Leslie Bricusse, für die Bühne konzipiert von Steve Cuden und Frank Wildhorn.

Der seltsame Fall des Dr. Jekyll und Mr. Hyde: Illustrierte und überarbeitete Fassung

This Dr. Jekyll And Mr. Hyde PDF Online is the best book I have ever read today. If you are interested in this Dr. Jekyll And Mr. Hyde PDF Kindle!! I recommend. Inhalt: Gabriel John Utterson is told of an encounter that happened some months ago at Carvendish Place. The tale describes a sinister figure who tramples a. Read Der seltsame Fall des Dr. Jekyll und Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson,​Charles Raymond Macauley with a free trial. Read unlimited* books and.

Jekyll And Hyde Online Öne çıkan kanallar Video

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (2003)

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde eBooks. Robert Louis Stevenson eBooks. Table of Contents. Story of the Door Search for Mr. Hyde Dr. Jekyll Was Quite at Ease The Carew Murder Case Incident of the Letter Incident of Dr. Lanyon Incident at the Window The Last Night Dr. Lanyon's Narrative Henry Jekyll's Full Statement of the Case. Literature Network» Robert Louis Stevenson» Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde» Chapter 1. Chapter 1. Story of the Door. Mr. Utterson the lawyer was a man of a rugged countenance that was never lighted by a smile; cold, scanty and embarrassed in It was a man of the name of Hyde." "Hm," said Mr. Utterson. "What sort of a man is he to see?" "He is. 10/25/ · Vizioneaza serialul Jekyll and Hyde () Online Subtitrat In Romana la o calitate superioara. Inspirat de romanul original al lui Robert Louis Stevenson, Jekyll și Hyde se află în în Londra și îl urmărește pe Robert Jekyll, nepotul lui Henry Jekyll, în încercarea sa de a descoperi identitatea sa reală, adevărata sa istorie familială și natura „blestemului” său. – pe Actors: Tom Bateman.

Software-Entwickler die dafГr notwendigen Voraussetzungen geschaffen haben Jekyll And Hyde Online, um Jekyll And Hyde Online Gewinne. - Wordsworth Classics, Hertfordshire 1993.

Telekolleg I.
Jekyll And Hyde Online Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde eBooks. Robert Louis Stevenson eBooks. Table of Contents. Story of the Door Search for Mr. Hyde Dr. Jekyll Was Quite at Ease The Carew Murder Case Incident of the Letter Incident of Dr. Lanyon Incident at the Window The Last Night Dr. Lanyon's Narrative Henry Jekyll's Full Statement of the Case. JekyllHYDE Apparel has redefined fitness apparel with attitude- high quality men's fitness apparel, women's fitness apparel, WOD gear, WOD shorts, workout clothes, fitness hoodies and accessories that are designed to fit and feel as good as they look. The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde By Robert Louis Stevenson Published by Planet eBoo k. Visit the site to download free eBooks of classic literature, books and novels. Jekyll & Hyde slot machine from Ash Gaming is a superb take on the 19 th century horror story of “The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde” by Robert Louis Stevenson. The plot of the slot surrounds a London lawyer in named Gabriel John Utterson, who’s job it was to investigate the weird goings on taking place with his friend Henry. Watch Jekyll and Hyde Free Online. Young Dr. Jekyll must deal with the curse he inherited from his grandfather that transforms him into the uninhibited superhuman Hyde. | Full season and episodes - free online streaming fast high quality legal movies and TV television shows. Shocking England Clipart of an M. With that he blew out his candle, put on a greatcoat, and set forth in the direction of Casino Prag Square, that citadel of medicine, where his friend, the great Dr. Jekyll returns to s London from Ceylon after he experiences a disturbing transformation. This was a fun series that I binged several episodes an evening.

And indeed the worst of my faults was a certain impatient gaiety of disposition, such as has made the happiness of many, but such as I found it hard to reconcile with my imperious desire to carry my head high, and wear a more than commonly grave countenance before the public.

Hence it came about that I concealed my pleasures; and that when I reached years of reflection, and began to look round me and take stock of my progress and position in the world, I stood already committed to a profound duplicity of me.

Many a man would have even blazoned such irregularities as I was guilty of; but from the high views that I had set before me, I regarded and hid them with an almost morbid sense of shame.

It was thus rather the exacting nature of my aspirations than any particular degradation in my faults, that made me what I was, and, with even a deeper trench than in the majority of men, severed in me those provinces of good and ill which divide and compound man's dual nature.

In this case, I was driven to reflect deeply and inveterately on that hard law of life, which lies at the root of religion and is one of the most plentiful springs of distress.

Though so profound a double-dealer, I was in no sense a hypocrite; both sides of me were in dead earnest; I was no more myself when I laid aside restraint and plunged in shame, than when I laboured, in the eye of day, at the futherance of knowledge or the relief of sorrow and suffering.

And it chanced that the direction of my scientific studies, which led wholly towards the mystic and the transcendental, reacted and shed a strong light on this consciousness of the perennial war among my members.

With every day, and from both sides of my intelligence, the moral and the intellectual, I thus drew steadily nearer to that truth, by whose partial discovery I have been doomed to such a dreadful shipwreck: that man is not truly one, but truly two.

I say two, because the state of my own knowledge does not pass beyond that point. Others will follow, others will outstrip me on the same lines; and I hazard the guess that man will be ultimately known for a mere polity of multifarious, incongruous and independent denizens.

I, for my part, from the nature of my life, advanced infallibly in one direction and in one direction only.

It was on the moral side, and in my own person, that I learned to recognise the thorough and primitive duality of man; I saw that, of the two natures that contended in the field of my consciousness, even if I could rightly be said to be either, it was only because I was radically both; and from an early date, even before the course of my scientific discoveries had begun to suggest the most naked possibility of such a miracle, I had learned to dwell with pleasure, as a beloved daydream, on the thought of the separation of these elements.

If each, I told myself, could be housed in separate identities, life would be relieved of all that was unbearable; the unjust might go his way, delivered from the aspirations and remorse of his more upright twin; and the just could walk steadfastly and securely on his upward path, doing the good things in which he found his pleasure, and no longer exposed to disgrace and penitence by the hands of this extraneous evil.

It was the curse of mankind that these incongruous faggots were thus bound together--that in the agonised womb of consciousness, these polar twins should be continuously struggling.

How, then were they dissociated? I was so far in my reflections when, as I have said, a side light began to shine upon the subject from the laboratory table.

I began to perceive more deeply than it has ever yet been stated, the trembling immateriality, the mistlike transience, of this seemingly so solid body in which we walk attired.

Certain agents I found to have the power to shake and pluck back that fleshly vestment, even as a wind might toss the curtains of a pavilion.

For two good reasons, I will not enter deeply into this scientific branch of my confession. First, because I have been made to learn that the doom and burthen of our life is bound for ever on man's shoulders, and when the attempt is made to cast it off, it but returns upon us with more unfamiliar and more awful pressure.

Second, because, as my narrative will make, alas! Enough then, that I not only recognised my natural body from the mere aura and effulgence of certain of the powers that made up my spirit, but managed to compound a drug by which these powers should be dethroned from their supremacy, and a second form and countenance substituted, none the less natural to me because they were the expression, and bore the stamp of lower elements in my soul.

I hesitated long before I put this theory to the test of practice. I knew well that I risked death; for any drug that so potently controlled and shook the very fortress of identity, might, by the least scruple of an overdose or at the least inopportunity in the moment of exhibition, utterly blot out that immaterial tabernacle which I looked to it to change.

But the temptation of a discovery so singular and profound at last overcame the suggestions of alarm. I had long since prepared my tincture; I purchased at once, from a firm of wholesale chemists, a large quantity of a particular salt which I knew, from my experiments, to be the last ingredient required; and late one accursed night, I compounded the elements, watched them boil and smoke together in the glass, and when the ebullition had subsided, with a strong glow of courage, drank off the potion.

Then these agonies began swiftly to subside, and I came to myself as if out of a great sickness. There was something strange in my sensations, something indescribably new and, from its very novelty, incredibly sweet.

I felt younger, lighter, happier in body; within I was conscious of a heady recklessness, a current of disordered sensual images running like a millrace in my fancy, a solution of the bonds of obligation, an unknown but not an innocent freedom of the soul.

I knew myself, at the first breath of this new life, to be more wicked, tenfold more wicked, sold a slave to my original evil; and the thought, in that moment, braced and delighted me like wine.

I stretched out my hands, exulting in the freshness of these sensations; and in the act, I was suddenly aware that I had lost in stature.

There was no mirror, at that date, in my room; that which stands beside me as I write, was brought there later on and for the very purpose of these transformations.

The night however, was far gone into the morning--the morning, black as it was, was nearly ripe for the conception of the day--the inmates of my house were locked in the most rigorous hours of slumber; and I determined, flushed as I was with hope and triumph, to venture in my new shape as far as to my bedroom.

I crossed the yard, wherein the constellations looked down upon me, I could have thought, with wonder, the first creature of that sort that their unsleeping vigilance had yet disclosed to them; I stole through the corridors, a stranger in my own house; and coming to my room, I saw for the first time the appearance of Edward Hyde.

I must here speak by theory alone, saying not that which I know, but that which I suppose to be most probable. The evil side of my nature, to which I had now transferred the stamping efficacy, was less robust and less developed than the good which I had just deposed.

Again, in the course of my life, which had been, after all, nine tenths a life of effort, virtue and control, it had been much less exercised and much less exhausted.

And hence, as I think, it came about that Edward Hyde was so much smaller, slighter and younger than Henry Jekyll. Even as good shone upon the countenance of the one, evil was written broadly and plainly on the face of the other.

Evil besides which I must still believe to be the lethal side of man had left on that body an imprint of deformity and decay. And yet when I looked upon that ugly idol in the glass, I was conscious of no repugnance, rather of a leap of welcome.

This, too, was myself. It seemed natural and human. In my eyes it bore a livelier image of the spirit, it seemed more express and single, than the imperfect and divided countenance I had been hitherto accustomed to call mine.

And in so far I was doubtless right. I have observed that when I wore the semblance of Edward Hyde, none could come near to me at first without a visible misgiving of the flesh.

That night I had come to the fatal cross-roads. Had I approached my discovery in a more noble spirit, had I risked the experiment while under the empire of generous or pious aspirations, all must have been otherwise, and from these agonies of death and birth, I had come forth an angel instead of a fiend.

The drug had no discriminating action; it was neither diabolical nor divine; it but shook the doors of the prisonhouse of my disposition; and like the captives of Philippi, that which stood within ran forth.

At that time my virtue slumbered; my evil, kept awake by ambition, was alert and swift to seize the occasion; and the thing that was projected was Edward Hyde.

Hence, although I had now two characters as well as two appearances, one was wholly evil, and the other was still the old Henry Jekyll, that incongruous compound of whose reformation and improvement I had already learned to despair.

The movement was thus wholly toward the worse. Even at that time, I had not conquered my aversions to the dryness of a life of study.

I would still be merrily disposed at times; and as my pleasures were to say the least undignified, and I was not only well known and highly considered, but growing towards the elderly man, this incoherency of my life was daily growing more unwelcome.

It was on this side that my new power tempted me until I fell in slavery. English Change language. FOR ALL NEW PLAYERS AT Vive Mon Casino.

CLICK TO PLAY. Play Full Screen. Report broken link. Bookmark this game. Read more. Related games View all games. Full Moon Fortunes. Play now.

I had taken a loathing to my gentleman at first sight. So had the child's family, which was only natural. But the doctor's case was what struck me.

He was the usual cut and dry apothecary, of no particular age and colour, with a strong Edinburgh accent and about as emotional as a bagpipe.

Well, sir, he was like the rest of us; every time he looked at my prisoner, I saw that Sawbones turn sick and white with desire to kill him.

I knew what was in his mind, just as he knew what was in mine; and killing being out of the question, we did the next best. We told the man we could and would make such a scandal out of this as should make his name stink from one end of London to the other.

If he had any friends or any credit, we undertook that he should lose them. And all the time, as we were pitching it in red hot, we were keeping the women off him as best we could for they were as wild as harpies.

I never saw a circle of such hateful faces; and there was the man in the middle, with a kind of black sneering coolness--frightened to, I could see that--but carrying it off, sir, really like Satan.

No gentleman but wishes to avoid a scene,' says he. The next thing was to get the money; and where do you think he carried us but to that place with the door?

The figure was stiff; but the signature was good for more than that if it was only genuine. I took the liberty of pointing out to my gentleman that the whole business looked apocryphal, and that a man does not, in real life, walk into a cellar door at four in the morning and come out with another man's cheque for close upon a hundred pounds.

But he was quite easy and sneering. I gave in the cheque myself, and said I had every reason to believe it was a forgery. Not a bit of it. The cheque was genuine.

For my man was a fellow that nobody could have to do with, a really damnable man; and the person that drew the cheque is the very pink of the proprieties, celebrated too, and what makes it worse one of your fellows who do what they call good.

Black mail I suppose; an honest man paying through the nose for some of the capers of his youth. Black Mail House is what I call the place with the door, in consequence.

Though even that, you know, is far from explaining all," he added, and with the words fell into a vein of musing. From this he was recalled by Mr.

You start a question, and it's like starting a stone. The middle one of the three windows was half-way open; and sitting close beside it, taking the air with an infinite sadness of mien, like some disconsolate prisoner, Utterson saw Dr.

It will not last long, thank God. Enfield and me. This is my cousin—Mr. Come now; get your hat and take a quick turn with us. But indeed, Utterson, I am very glad to see you; this is really a great pleasure; I would ask you and Mr.

Enfield up, but the place is really not fit. But the words were hardly uttered, before the smile was struck out of his face and succeeded by an expression of such abject terror and despair, as froze the very blood of the two gentlemen below.

They saw it but for a glimpse for the window was instantly thrust down; but that glimpse had been sufficient, and they turned and left the court without a word.

In silence, too, they traversed the by-street; and it was not until they had come into a neighbouring thoroughfare, where even upon a Sunday there were still some stirrings of life, that Mr.

Utterson at last turned and looked at his companion. They were both pale; and there was an answering horror in their eyes. Utterson was sitting by his fireside one evening after dinner, when he was surprised to receive a visit from Poole.

What are you afraid of? Even now, he sat with the glass of wine untasted on his knee, and his eyes directed to a corner of the floor.

Try to tell me what it is. What does the man mean? It was a wild, cold, seasonable night of March, with a pale moon, lying on her back as though the wind had tilted her, and flying wrack of the most diaphanous and lawny texture.

The wind made talking difficult, and flecked the blood into the face. It seemed to have swept the streets unusually bare of passengers, besides; for Mr.

Utterson thought he had never seen that part of London so deserted. He could have wished it otherwise; never in his life had he been conscious of so sharp a wish to see and touch his fellow-creatures; for struggle as he might, there was borne in upon his mind a crushing anticipation of calamity.

The square, when they got there, was full of wind and dust, and the thin trees in the garden were lashing themselves along the railing.

Poole, who had kept all the way a pace or two ahead, now pulled up in the middle of the pavement, and in spite of the biting weather, took off his hat and mopped his brow with a red pocket-handkerchief.

But for all the hurry of his coming, these were not the dews of exertion that he wiped away, but the moisture of some strangling anguish; for his face was white and his voice, when he spoke, harsh and broken.

The hall, when they entered it, was brightly lighted up; the fire was built high; and about the hearth the whole of the servants, men and women, stood huddled together like a flock of sheep.

At the sight of Mr. Are you all here? Blank silence followed, no one protesting; only the maid lifted her voice and now wept loudly.

Utterson to follow him, and led the way to the back garden. Here Poole motioned him to stand on one side and listen; while he himself, setting down the candle and making a great and obvious call on his resolution, mounted the steps and knocked with a somewhat uncertain hand on the red baize of the cabinet door.

Utterson back across the yard and into the great kitchen, where the fire was out and the beetles were leaping on the floor.

Utterson, biting his finger. Jekyll to have been—well, murdered, what could induce the murderer to stay? Well, sir, every day, ay, and twice and thrice in the same day, there have been orders and complaints, and I have been sent flying to all the wholesale chemists in town.

Every time I brought the stuff back, there would be another paper telling me to return it, because it was not pure, and another order to a different firm.

This drug is wanted bitter bad, sir, whatever for. Poole felt in his pocket and handed out a crumpled note, which the lawyer, bending nearer to the candle, carefully examined.

Jekyll presents his compliments to Messrs. He assures them that their last sample is impure and quite useless for his present purpose.

In the year 18—, Dr. He now begs them to search with most sedulous care, and should any of the same quality be left, forward it to him at once.

Expense is no consideration. The importance of this to Dr. I came suddenly into the theatre from the garden.

It seems he had slipped out to look for this drug or whatever it is; for the cabinet door was open, and there he was at the far end of the room digging among the crates.

He looked up when I came in, gave a kind of cry, and whipped upstairs into the cabinet. It was but for one minute that I saw him, but the hair stood upon my head like quills.

Sir, if that was my master, why had he a mask upon his face? If it was my master, why did he cry out like a rat, and run from me?

I have served him long enough. And then Your master, Poole, is plainly seized with one of those maladies that both torture and deform the sufferer; hence, for aught I know, the alteration of his voice; hence the mask and the avoidance of his friends; hence his eagerness to find this drug, by means of which the poor soul retains some hope of ultimate recovery—God grant that he be not deceived!

There is my explanation; it is sad enough, Poole, ay, and appalling to consider; but it is plain and natural, hangs well together, and delivers us from all exorbitant alarms.

Do you think I do not know where his head comes to in the cabinet door, where I saw him every morning of my life? No, sir, that thing in the mask was never Dr.

Jekyll—God knows what it was, but it was never Dr. Jekyll; and it is the belief of my heart that there was murder done.

The lawyer took that rude but weighty instrument into his hand, and balanced it. This masked figure that you saw, did you recognise it?

You see, it was much of the same bigness; and it had the same quick, light way with it; and then who else could have got in by the laboratory door?

You have not forgot, sir, that at the time of the murder he had still the key with him? Utterson, if you ever met this Mr.

Evil, I fear, founded—evil was sure to come—of that connection. Well, let our name be vengeance. Call Bradshaw. Poole, here, and I are going to force our way into the cabinet.

If all is well, my shoulders are broad enough to bear the blame. Meanwhile, lest anything should really be amiss, or any malefactor seek to escape by the back, you and the boy must go round the corner with a pair of good sticks and take your post at the laboratory door.

We give you ten minutes to get to your stations. As Bradshaw left, the lawyer looked at his watch. The scud had banked over the moon, and it was now quite dark.

The wind, which only broke in puffs and draughts into that deep well of building, tossed the light of the candle to and fro about their steps, until they came into the shelter of the theatre, where they sat down silently to wait.

London hummed solemnly all around; but nearer at hand, the stillness was only broken by the sounds of a footfall moving to and fro along the cabinet floor.

But hark again, a little closer—put your heart in your ears, Mr. The steps fell lightly and oddly, with a certain swing, for all they went so slowly; it was different indeed from the heavy creaking tread of Henry Jekyll.

Utterson sighed. But now the ten minutes drew to an end. Poole disinterred the axe from under a stack of packing straw; the candle was set upon the nearest table to light them to the attack; and they drew near with bated breath to where that patient foot was still going up and down, up and down, in the quiet of the night.

Poole swung the axe over his shoulder; the blow shook the building, and the red baize door leaped against the lock and hinges. A dismal screech, as of mere animal terror, rang from the cabinet.

Up went the axe again, and again the panels crashed and the frame bounded; four times the blow fell; but the wood was tough and the fittings were of excellent workmanship; and it was not until the fifth, that the lock burst and the wreck of the door fell inwards on the carpet.

The besiegers, appalled by their own riot and the stillness that had succeeded, stood back a little and peered in.

There lay the cabinet before their eyes in the quiet lamplight, a good fire glowing and chattering on the hearth, the kettle singing its thin strain, a drawer or two open, papers neatly set forth on the business table, and nearer the fire, the things laid out for tea; the quietest room, you would have said, and, but for the glazed presses full of chemicals, the most commonplace that night in London.

Right in the middle there lay the body of a man sorely contorted and still twitching. They drew near on tiptoe, turned it on its back and beheld the face of Edward Hyde.

Hyde is gone to his account; and it only remains for us to find the body of your master. The far greater proportion of the building was occupied by the theatre, which filled almost the whole ground storey and was lighted from above, and by the cabinet, which formed an upper storey at one end and looked upon the court.

A corridor joined the theatre to the door on the by-street; and with this the cabinet communicated separately by a second flight of stairs. There were besides a few dark closets and a spacious cellar.

All these they now thoroughly examined. Each closet needed but a glance, for all were empty, and all, by the dust that fell from their doors, had stood long unopened.

Nowhere was there any trace of Henry Jekyll, dead or alive. Poole stamped on the flags of the corridor. It was locked; and lying near by on the flags, they found the key, already stained with rust.

They mounted the stair in silence, and still with an occasional awestruck glance at the dead body, proceeded more thoroughly to examine the contents of the cabinet.

At one table, there were traces of chemical work, various measured heaps of some white salt being laid on glass saucers, as though for an experiment in which the unhappy man had been prevented.

There were several books on a shelf; one lay beside the tea things open, and Utterson was amazed to find it a copy of a pious work, for which Jekyll had several times expressed a great esteem, annotated, in his own hand with startling blasphemies.

Next, in the course of their review of the chamber, the searchers came to the cheval-glass, into whose depths they looked with an involuntary horror.

But it was so turned as to show them nothing but the rosy glow playing on the roof, the fire sparkling in a hundred repetitions along the glazed front of the presses, and their own pale and fearful countenances stooping to look in.

Next they turned to the business table. The lawyer unsealed it, and several enclosures fell to the floor. The first was a will, drawn in the same eccentric terms as the one which he had returned six months before, to serve as a testament in case of death and as a deed of gift in case of disappearance; but in place of the name of Edward Hyde, the lawyer, with indescribable amazement read the name of Gabriel John Utterson.

He looked at Poole, and then back at the paper, and last of all at the dead malefactor stretched upon the carpet.

He cannot have been disposed of in so short a space; he must be still alive, he must have fled! And then, why fled? O, we must be careful.

I foresee that we may yet involve your master in some dire catastrophe. Go then, and first read the narrative which Lanyon warned me he was to place in your hands; and if you care to hear more, turn to the confession of.

The lawyer put it in his pocket. If your master has fled or is dead, we may at least save his credit. It is now ten; I must go home and read these documents in quiet; but I shall be back before midnight, when we shall send for the police.

They went out, locking the door of the theatre behind them; and Utterson, once more leaving the servants gathered about the fire in the hall, trudged back to his office to read the two narratives in which this mystery was now to be explained.

On the ninth of January, now four days ago, I received by the evening delivery a registered envelope, addressed in the hand of my colleague and old school companion, Henry Jekyll.

I was a good deal surprised by this; for we were by no means in the habit of correspondence; I had seen the man, dined with him, indeed, the night before; and I could imagine nothing in our intercourse that should justify formality of registration.

The contents increased my wonder; for this is how the letter ran:. Lanyon, my life, my honour, my reason, are all at your mercy; if you fail me to-night, I am lost.

You might suppose, after this preface, that I am going to ask you for something dishonourable to grant. Judge for yourself.

Poole, my butler, has his orders; you will find him waiting your arrival with a locksmith. The door of my cabinet is then to be forced; and you are to go in alone; to open the glazed press letter E on the left hand, breaking the lock if it be shut; and to draw out, with all its contents as they stand , the fourth drawer from the top or which is the same thing the third from the bottom.

In my extreme distress of mind, I have a morbid fear of misdirecting you; but even if I am in error, you may know the right drawer by its contents: some powders, a phial and a paper book.

This drawer I beg of you to carry back with you to Cavendish Square exactly as it stands. You should be back, if you set out at once on the receipt of this, long before midnight; but I will leave you that amount of margin, not only in the fear of one of those obstacles that can neither be prevented nor foreseen, but because an hour when your servants are in bed is to be preferred for what will then remain to do.

At midnight, then, I have to ask you to be alone in your consulting room, to admit with your own hand into the house a man who will present himself in my name, and to place in his hands the drawer that you will have brought with you from my cabinet.

Then you will have played your part and earned my gratitude completely. Five minutes afterwards, if you insist upon an explanation, you will have understood that these arrangements are of capital importance; and that by the neglect of one of them, fantastic as they must appear, you might have charged your conscience with my death or the shipwreck of my reason.

Think of me at this hour, in a strange place, labouring under a blackness of distress that no fancy can exaggerate, and yet well aware that, if you will but punctually serve me, my troubles will roll away like a story that is told.

Serve me, my dear Lanyon and save. It is possible that the post-office may fail me, and this letter not come into your hands until to-morrow morning.

In that case, dear Lanyon, do my errand when it shall be most convenient for you in the course of the day; and once more expect my messenger at midnight.

It may then already be too late; and if that night passes without event, you will know that you have seen the last of Henry Jekyll.

Upon the reading of this letter, I made sure my colleague was insane; but till that was proved beyond the possibility of doubt, I felt bound to do as he requested.

The less I understood of this farrago, the less I was in a position to judge of its importance; and an appeal so worded could not be set aside without a grave responsibility.

The butler was awaiting my arrival; he had received by the same post as mine a registered letter of instruction, and had sent at once for a locksmith and a carpenter.

The tradesmen came while we were yet speaking; and we moved in a body to old Dr. The door was very strong, the lock excellent; the carpenter avowed he would have great trouble and have to do much damage, if force were to be used; and the locksmith was near despair.

The press marked E was unlocked; and I took out the drawer, had it filled up with straw and tied in a sheet, and returned with it to Cavendish Square.

Here I proceeded to examine its contents. The phial, to which I next turned my attention, might have been about half full of a blood-red liquor, which was highly pungent to the sense of smell and seemed to me to contain phosphorus and some volatile ether.

At the other ingredients I could make no guess. The book was an ordinary version book and contained little but a series of dates. These covered a period of many years, but I observed that the entries ceased nearly a year ago and quite abruptly.

How could the presence of these articles in my house affect either the honour, the sanity, or the life of my flighty colleague?

If his messenger could go to one place, why could he not go to another? And even granting some impediment, why was this gentleman to be received by me in secret?

The more I reflected the more convinced I grew that I was dealing with a case of cerebral disease; and though I dismissed my servants to bed, I loaded an old revolver, that I might be found in some posture of self-defence.

I went myself at the summons, and found a small man crouching against the pillars of the portico. These particulars struck me, I confess, disagreeably; and as I followed him into the bright light of the consulting room, I kept my hand ready on my weapon.

Here, at last, I had a chance of clearly seeing him. I had never set eyes on him before, so much was certain. He was small, as I have said; I was struck besides with the shocking expression of his face, with his remarkable combination of great muscular activity and great apparent debility of constitution, and—last but not least—with the odd, subjective disturbance caused by his neighbourhood.

This bore some resemblance to incipient rigour, and was accompanied by a marked sinking of the pulse. At the time, I set it down to some idiosyncratic, personal distaste, and merely wondered at the acuteness of the symptoms; but I have since had reason to believe the cause to lie much deeper in the nature of man, and to turn on some nobler hinge than the principle of hatred.

This person who had thus, from the first moment of his entrance, struck in me what I can only describe as a disgustful curiosity was dressed in a fashion that would have made an ordinary person laughable; his clothes, that is to say, although they were of rich and sober fabric, were enormously too large for him in every measurement—the trousers hanging on his legs and rolled up to keep them from the ground, the waist of the coat below his haunches, and the collar sprawling wide upon his shoulders.

Strange to relate, this ludicrous accoutrement was far from moving me to laughter. These observations, though they have taken so great a space to be set down in, were yet the work of a few seconds.

My visitor was, indeed, on fire with sombre excitement. I put him back, conscious at his touch of a certain icy pang along my blood.

Be seated, if you please. I come here at the instance of your colleague, Dr. Henry Jekyll, on a piece of business of some moment; and I understood He sprang to it, and then paused, and laid his hand upon his heart; I could hear his teeth grate with the convulsive action of his jaws; and his face was so ghastly to see that I grew alarmed both for his life and reason.

He turned a dreadful smile to me, and as if with the decision of despair, plucked away the sheet.

At sight of the contents, he uttered one loud sob of such immense relief that I sat petrified. He thanked me with a smiling nod, measured out a few minims of the red tincture and added one of the powders.

The mixture, which was at first of a reddish hue, began, in proportion as the crystals melted, to brighten in colour, to effervesce audibly, and to throw off small fumes of vapour.

Suddenly and at the same moment, the ebullition ceased and the compound changed to a dark purple, which faded again more slowly to a watery green.

Inhalt: Gabriel John Utterson is told of an encounter that happened some months ago at Carvendish Place. The tale describes a sinister figure who tramples a. Robert Louis Stevenson: Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde. London: Penguin English Library, Reclams UniveRsal-BiBliothek Nr. , Philipp Reclam. Sollte dir das Spiel gefallen, kannst du auch ganz einfach in ein Online Casino wechseln und dort direkt um echtes Geld spielen. Jekyll & Hyde Slot im Internet. Read Der seltsame Fall des Dr. Jekyll und Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson,​Charles Raymond Macauley with a free trial. Read unlimited* books and.
Jekyll And Hyde Online
Jekyll And Hyde Online After all, I reflected, I was like my neighbours; and then I smiled, comparing myself with other men, comparing my active good-will with the lazy cruelty of their neglect. It was unlikely that the doctor should fear death; and yet Racebets App was what Utterson was tempted to suspect. With every day, and from both sides of my intelligence, the moral and the intellectual, I New Casino Offers drew steadily nearer to that truth, by whose partial discovery I have been doomed to such a dreadful shipwreck: that man is not truly one, but truly two. Hyde at such an hour and in such a strange array; and ten minutes later, Dr. Chapter 2. The doctor had bought the house from the U Kash of a celebrated surgeon; and his own tastes being rather chemical than anatomical, had changed the destination of the block at the bottom of the garden. And then all of a sudden he broke out in a great flame of anger, stamping with his foot, brandishing the cane, and carrying on as Snooker Championship maid described it like a madman. But I have gone too far in the way of inexplicable services to pause before I see the end. Utterson sighed. But there was one curious circumstance. And thus fortified, as I supposed, on every Casino Bellevue, I began to profit by the strange immunities of my position. I knew myself, at the first breath of this new life, to be more wicked, tenfold more wicked, sold a slave to my original evil; and the thought, in that moment, braced and delighted Darling Hotel Sydney Casino like wine. The veil Jekyll And Hyde Online self-indulgence was rent from head to foot.
Jekyll And Hyde Online PDF Kindle Motorrad - Oldtimer- Katalog 3. Alle Rechte vorbehalten. Einblicke In Die Turkische Kultur Puzzle Spiele Online Gratis Download Free Schachnovelle Hamburger Lesehefte PDF Online Schoebe Elementargrammatik: Mit Rechtschreibung Und Zeichensetzung PDF complete Schule: Was Ist Ein Guter Lehrer? Mit absolutem Schrecken beobachtet er die Verwandlung im Labor und setzt alles daran, Lindt Täfelchen Freund zu retten.

Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

0 Gedanken zu “Jekyll And Hyde Online”

Schreibe einen Kommentar

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind mit * markiert.